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What are Microgreens? 

Microgreens are a popular culinary trend because of their intense flavor and extraordinarily high vitamin content (a USDA study found that microgreens have five times more nutrients than a mature plant). They've been used for years in high-end restaurants, but microgreens have become increasingly familiar to home cooks thanks to how quickly and easily they grow.

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Amaranth

Amaranth microgreens have a nutty, rich flavour and are 15% protein. They are rich in vitamins A, B, C, and E, calcium, iron, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, and amino acids.

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Basil

Basil, also called great basil, is a culinary herb of the family Lamiaceae. It is a tender plant, and is used in cuisines worldwide.

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Broccoli

Baby broccoli herbs are picked 10 days after planting to create broccoli microgreens. Greater amounts of calcium, iron, zinc, and potassium are present in these

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Carrots

Carrot microgreens have a mild, sweet, and earthy flavor with a hint of carrot-like taste. Carrot microgreens can be used in various food combinations to add flavor and nutrition to your meals.

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Celery

Celery microgreens are rich in lots of different vitamins and minerals. It's low on the glycemic index so celery microgreens won't spike your blood sugar,

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Collards

Micro Collard Greens have the same flavor as adult collard greens, but with more flavor intensity. Collards make a great base for a microgreen salad

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Daikon Radish

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Kale

A superfood taking the health and culinary worlds by storm. Kale microgreens are astoundingly teeming with vitamins: K (325%), C (103.78%), A (26.78%), B2 (26.69%), B6 (11.31%), and B9 (15.50%)

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Lettuce

Young seedlings of lettuce that are approximately 1–3 inches tall. They have a more intense flavor and higher nutritional value than mature lettuce.

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Parsley

Not only tasty, but they are also a great source of vitamins A. C and K, minerals, and antioxidants. They are known to hold fiber, potassium, magnesium, and calcium.

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Red cabbage

ed cabbage microgreens may help in gastrointestinal health, reduce inflammation, decrease weight gain, and even prevent cancer and reduce risk of Alzheimer's.

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Sunflower

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Arugula

Great for keeping your bones strong and healthy. That's because they contain about the same quantity of calcium as spinach

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Beets

Beet microgreens, rich in vitamins A, C, K, iron, magnesium, and potassium, are nutrient-dense. They contain betalains, potent antioxidants supporting heart health

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Buckwheat

Buckwheat isn’t a wheat at all, in fact it derives from the rhubarb and sorrel family. The seeds interestingly are shaped like little pyramids. Their flavor is mild and somewhat of a tangy variety.

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Cauliflower

Full of vitamins and minerals that can help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. Health benefits aside, they also have a deliciously crisp texture when eaten raw

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Cilantro

If you enjoy the taste of full-grown cilantro, then you'll enjoy the taste of it in microgreen form as well. One of the more intensely flavored microgreens available, micro-cilantro packs a big cilantro punch in a tiny package.

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Cress

Packed full of: vitamins A, C, & K, and omega-3 fatty acids. As such, this tiny herb may aid immunity, disease prevention, weight loss, organ function, inflammation, heart health, and diabetes.

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Dill

Contain calcium. These are also a good source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, B-complex vitamins, vitamin C, iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and zinc

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Kohlrabi

Very nutritious and contain over 100% of the recommended daily value of Vitamin C. It's also high in Vitamin B6, Folate (B9), Thiamin (B1), potassium, phosphorus, and calcium.

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Mustard greens

Microgreen mustard seeds produce mildly spicy, tender, succulent microgreens that add mild horseradish flavour to salads and blends.

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Radish

Part of the Brassica family, they taste like a milder version of regular radishes – but because they are picked so early they are simply brimming with nutrients.

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Spinach

hey are rich in nutrients – and the best thing about them is that they give you all the goodness of mature spinach in a much more concentrated form

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Swiss chard

Sweet earthy flavor similar to beets, which is no surprise since they're in the beet family. They're also full of nutrients including vitamins A, B, C, and K, dietary fiber, and protein.

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